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Like other members of the Indian paintbrush family, these vibrant, high elevation-loving wildflowers are hemisitic. They feed at least is some part on the roots of neighboring grasses and wildflowers. If you look closely, the bright magenta part isn't the flower, but are colored leaves called bracts. The actual flowers are the tiny yellowish-green tubes sticking out of the bracts. These were photographed in the subalpine heights on Washington's Mount Rainier.
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Like other members of the Indian paintbrush family, these vibrant, high elevation-loving wildflowers are hemisitic. They feed at least is some part on the roots of neighboring grasses and wildflowers. If you look closely, the bright magenta part isn't the flower, but are colored leaves called bracts. The actual flowers are the tiny yellowish-green tubes sticking out of the bracts. These were photographed in the subalpine heights on Washington's Mount Rainier.